mPEG-PLGA from PolyScitech used in development of dual-drug nanotherapy treatment for non-small cell lung cancer

Non-small cell lung cancer is an extremely prevelant type of cancer with over 200K cases in the USA per year. Typically it is treated using chemotherapy and radiotherapy, but the incidence of reoccurrence is quite high after these therapies. Recently, researchers working jointly at University of North Carolina, Tiangin Vocational Institute (China), Westminster College, China Medical University, and Peking Union Medical College (China) used mPEG-PLGA from PolySciTech (www.polyscitech.com) (PolyVivo AK029) to develop a co-encapsulated nanoparticle loaded with paclitaxel and a cisplatin prodrug. They applied this to a mouse model of lung cancer and found the particles reduced tumor growth more effectively than loose drug administration. This research holds promise to improve the treatment of lung cancer. Read more: Jing Tian,  Yuanzeng Min,  Zachary Rodgers,  Kin Man Au,  Charles Tilden Hagan,  Maofan Zhang,  Kyle Roche,  Feifei Yang,  Kyle Thomas Wagner  and  Andrew Z Wang “Co-delivery of paclitaxel and cisplatin with biocompatible PLGA-PEG nanoparticles enhances chemoradiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer models.” J. Mater. Chem. B, 2017, Accepted Manuscript. DOI 10.1039/C7TB01370A http://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlelanding/2017/tb/c7tb01370a#!divAbstract

“Abstract: Chemoradiotherapy (CRT) with paclitaxel (PTX) and cisplatin (CP) is part of the standard of care for patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Despite the high treatment intensity, many patients still develop local recurrence after treatment. Thus, there is a strong need to further improve CRT for lung cancer. One strategy is to co-deliver cytotoxic chemotherapy agents using biocompatible nanoparticles (NPs) which can limit off-target tissue toxicity and improve therapeutic efficacy. Herein, we report the development of dual-drug loaded nanoformulations that improve the efficacy of CRT for NSCLC by co-encapsulation of cisplatin (CP) and PTX in PLGA-PEG NPs. Mice bearing NSCLC xenografts given the dual-drug loaded NPs during CRT showed greater inhibition of tumor growth than free drug combinations or combinations of single-drug loaded NPs. These results indicate that using a NP co-delivery strategy for this common CRT regimen may improve clinical responses in NSCLC patients. Supplementary details http://www.rsc.org/suppdata/c7/tb/c7tb01370a/c7tb01370a1.pdf

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